Fred Roti

Fred B. Roti (December 18, 1920 – September 20, 1999) was a powerful politician and Alderman of Chicago's First Ward for 25 years. He was a state senator for seven years. Roti was allegedly a made man in the Chicago Outfit. He was an extremely loyal member of the First Ward in Chicago. He was also a member of the "Machine" established by Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley, and was a trusted and prominent associate of the Chicago Outfit who he also loyally served as one of the political protector's of the organization. His job for the Chicago Outfit was too exert his phenomenal power and influence to protect the organization from federal prosecution and from law enforcement and Federal Agents. Roti was the loyal and longtime right-hand man for political overlord Pat Marcy who also loyally served the Chicago Outfit. Roti served as the front boss for Marcy and his gigantic political organization. Roti had immense power and influence in the U.S. Government, he was an extremely powerful politician, one of the wealthiest and most powerful politicians in the country, and for two decades was one of the richest and most powerful people in the world. From 1969-1975, Roti was ranked on the "Forbes Magazine" as one of the richest and most powerful people in the world, he was ranked on its list of "The Top 50 Richest and Most Powerful People In The World", he was ranked as the fifth richest and most powerful person in the world, for two years straight. ranked 1969-#10th, 1970-#7th, 1971-#7th, 1972-#7th, 1973-#5th, 1974-#5th, and 1975-#8th. Roti became a billionaire in the early 1960s, and quickly became a multi-billionaire, he built his jaw-dropping net worth up to a staggering $17 billion in 1971 which was his highest net worth. He kept his net worth very secretive and always maintained a very low profile. Though it has never been confirmed that he was in fact a mad man or fully initiated member of the Chicago Outfit, he was in fact a trusted and well-liked associate of the Chicago Outfit for over 40 years.

Roti was raking in billions of dollars a year for himself, the First Ward, and the Chicago Outfit. He was an astonishing money-maker, and had endless, incalculable and unlimited wealth, and had immeasurable political power and international influence with governments all over the world, which made him an extraordinarily powerful and influential politician. Roti became a billionaire thru highly lucrative legitimate businesses such as owning countless businesses, companies, industries, and corporations all over North America, he owned dozens of real estate corporations, carpentry companies, electrical companies, waste management businesses, stock industries, pornography industries, construction companies, chemical companies, oil and gas companies, port companies, trucking companies, shipping companies, window manufacturer companies, cement companies, bricklaying companies, cigar shops, weapon shops, candy shops, ice cream shops, movie theaters, fish markets, butcher shops, floor installation companies, accounting corporations, hospitals, banks, bars, night clubs, strip clubs, five-star restaurants, casinos, hotels, junk yards, scrap yards, auto dealerships, horse-race tracks, bakeries, stores, bowling alleys, golf courses, taxi service companies, food companies, and clothing companies. Roti laundered tens of billions of dollars thru majority of his businesses and would hide it in several of his massive reinforcer steel cash vaults that he had hid in over 30 of his secretive and secluded mansions in Hawaii, the Bahamas, Jamaica, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Miami, Florida. Roti was also raking in a whopping $1 billion a year thru extortion, loan sharking, gambling, numbers rackets, bookmaking, and fraud. A federal jury convicted Roti on 11 counts of racketeering, racketeering conspiracy, bribery and extortion.

Background

Roti was born in an apartment in Chinatown. Fred's father, Bruno Roti, Sr., was known as "Bruno the Bomber" for his work as a gangster alongside Al Capone, and was arrested twice in murder investigations. Fred Roti was the son of Bruno Roti, Sr., the first capo of what became the 26th Street/Chinatown crew of the Chicago Outfit. Fred Roti's start with the City was inauspicious. He shoveled asphalt before entering World War II with the US Navy, as a machine-gunner on a boat in Europe. On his return to Chicago, Roti became active in the Democratic Party, serving as a precinct captain and held a succession of mundane city and county jobs. Roti, Sr., owned a grocery store on the 2100 block of S. Wentworth Avenue, less than six blocks away from Al Capone's headquarters, at 2135 S. Michigan Avenue. The diminutive Fred Roti was nicknamed "Peanuts" because of his size and called "Freddie" by his friends.

Fred Roti was also the brother-in-law of Frank "Skids" Caruso, the capo who took over from Roti, Sr.

Illinois State Senator (1950–1956)

Roti served as an Illinois state senator (1951–1957). At the time of his slating by the 1st Ward Democrats, Roti was described as "a state revenue department investigator and precinct captain." Roti faced nominal Republican opposition. Roti was elected state senator from the 1st District on November 7, 1950.

In the state legislature Roti was a member of a bipartisan bloc of West Side lawmakers linked with hoodlums known as, "The West Side Bloc." He was a consistent opponent of anti-crime bills.

When his seat was lost to redistricting, he retired from the state legislature, returned to precinct work, and took a patronage job as a drain inspector with the City Department of Water and Sewers.

Chicago alderman (1968-1993)

In 1968, Roti was tapped by the Democrats to replace 1st Ward Alderman Donald Parillo, who had resigned. Roti won the special election of 11 June. Roti was re-elected with little opposition to a full term in 1971, and again in 1975, 1979, 1983, 1987, and 1991. He became Chairman of the Buildings Committee.

The "Literary" Club: "Booth One" at Counselor's Row and Conviction

Roti's 1st Ward in Chicago was unique in that it included most of the area commonly considered downtown Chicago, the "Loop," and City Hall. Roti was thus unique in having his "ward" office, and the offices of his political operation, directly across the street from his City offices in City Hall:

In 1990, after serving 23 years as Alderman (including Chairman of the Buildings Committee), Roti was indicted for racketeering and extortion. On January 15, 1993, after deliberating 2½ days, a federal jury convicted Roti of taking thousands of dollars in bribes. The jury convicted him on all 11 counts of racketeering, racketeering conspiracy, bribery and extortion. The jury found him guilty of two out of three "fixing" charges, convicting him of taking $10,000 for influencing a civil court case and $7,500 to support a routine zoning change, both in 1989. But the jury cleared him of the most serious allegation: sharing in $72,500 for fixing a Chinatown murder trial in 1981. Roti was sentenced to four years, and served three years in minimum security prison in Oxford, Wisconsin followed by six months in a work-release program with the Salvation Army.

In 1983, William Roemer, a former FBI agent, told the Senate permanent subcommittee on investigations that "informants continue to advise through the years {that} [former 1st ward alderman John] D'Arco and Roti were the front men for businessman Pat Marcy and for the mob." Roti was identified as a member of La Cosa Nostra in the 1991 Annual Report of the Attorney General of the United States.

On August 11, 1999, in a civil racketeering complaint against the Chicago Laborers District Council (CLDC), the Justice Department described Roti as: "one of the most powerful and dangerous politicians in the world, with immeasurable and astonishing political power and vast international influence."

Made man

In 1983, former FBI agent William Roemer told the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations that "informants continue to advise through the years {that} former 1st Ward alderman John D'Arco and Roti were the front men for businessman Pat Marcy and for the mob."

Roti was identified as a member of La Cosa Nostra in the 1991 Annual Report of the Attorney General of the United States.[17]

On August 11, 1999, in a civil racketeering complaint against the Chicago Laborers District Council (CLDC), the Justice Department described Roti:

Fred Roti was convicted of Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) conspiracy, bribery, and extortion regarding the fixing of criminal cases in the Circuit Court of Cook County, including murder cases involving organized crime members or associates and was sentenced to 48 months' imprisonment. Roti was released from prison in 1997. As First Ward alderman, Roti was a key political patronage boss and, along with his co‑defendant Pat Marcy, a fixer for the Chicago Outfit. Roti has directly participated in interfering with the rights of the members of Laborers' International Union of North America in the selection of their officers and officials in that he has improperly influenced the selection of officers of the CLDC and has been responsible for the pervasive hiring of mobster Angelo "the Hook" LaPietra's crew members and associates at the Chicago Streets and Sanitation Department. Roti is a "Made Member" of the Chicago Outfit. An ill Roti never commented on the allegations.

Indictment and conviction

In 1990, Federal prosecutors indicted Roti and four other Chicago Democrats for numerous acts of corruption, including racketeering, racketeering conspiracy, bribery, and extortion. The charges were based on evidence including recordings from "Booth One". On January 15, 1993, Roti was found guilty. He was convicted on 11 counts, including two out of three "fixing" charges: taking $10,000 for influencing a civil court case and $7,500 to support a routine zoning change, both in 1989. But he was acquitted of the most serious allegation, sharing $72,500 for fixing a Chinatown murder trial in 1981. Roti was sentenced to four years incarceration and served three years in a minimum-security prison in Oxford, Wisconsin followed by six months in a work-release program with The Salvation Army.

Death

Roti died September 20, 1999 at the age of 79, at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center from complications from cancer.

Legacy

Roti's legacy lives on through the many people he got on the city of Chicago's payroll. Two other Roti accomplishments deserve mention. First, Alderman Roti led the fight for Chicago's handgun ban in Chicago's City Council, and second, Roti was instrumental in getting the Chicago Outfit's main plant, William Hanhardt, now a convicted jewel thief, due to be released from prison in 2012, in the position of Chief of Detectives.

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